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August 26, 2014

misspelledlife:

SLAAAAY TORONTO IM SO PROUD OF THIS

Posted 1 day ago · via lisaedelstein   153,422 notes

Rashida Jones, Amy Poehler and Aubrey Plaza at the NBC Emmy Party (NBC Entertainment at Boa Steakhouse, West Hollywood, Calif., August 24, 2014)

Posted 1 day ago · via poehlered   1,092 notes

Posted 1 day ago · via samuel-seaborn   152 notes

belindapendragon:

aliasvaughn:

LOL. Marry them off.

I ship it…LOL.

Posted 1 day ago · via georgesus 2,166 notes

spoken-not-written:

jawngreenyoukiller:

howimetyoureffingmother:

favourite person in the world.

^

everybodyone

Posted 1 day ago · via jamisanrook   618,211 notes

Posted 1 day ago · via thefuuuucomics   141,210 notes

Posted 1 day ago · via slowitdowngoeasy   15,261 notes

smwinchestr:

Christina Hendricks @ the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

smwinchestr:

Christina Hendricks @ the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

Posted 1 day ago · via poehlered   389 notes


Sarah Paulson | 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

Sarah Paulson | 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

Posted 1 day ago · via reginasmillls   1,996 notes

Posted 1 day ago · via changesbringdifferences   506,697 notes

englandsdreaming:

Taylor Schilling at the 2014 Primetime Emmys

Posted 1 day ago · via changesbringdifferences   28 notes

rphvevo:

OKAY you don’t have to like beyonce but don’t you DARE say she is overrated. 

this woman has been working at it since she was A CHILD 

this woman is one of the most WEALTHY, POWERFUL, CREATIVE, TALENTED, VISIONARY, LEGENDARY, ICONIC, WORLD RENOWN, INDESTRUCTIBLE PERFORMERS IN THE PLANET 

don’t you dare say the success of a MOTHER, WIFE, PERFORMER, ARTIST, WOMAN OF COLOR is not well deserved just because you don’t like her. 

Posted 1 day ago · via georgesus   16,709 notes


Natasha Lyonne arrives to the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

Natasha Lyonne arrives to the 66th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards

Posted 1 day ago · via seeminglyreal   2,761 notes

In a study of children aged 2-5, parents interrupted their daughters more than their sons, and fathers were more likely to talk simultaneously with their children than mothers were. Jennifer Coates says: “It seems that fathers try to control conversation more than mothers… and both parents try to control conversation more with daughters than with sons. The implicit message to girls is that they are more interruptible and that their right to speak is less than that of boys.”

Girls and boys’ differing understanding of when to talk, when to be quiet, what is polite and so on, has a visible impact on the dynamics of the classroom. Just as men dominate the floor in business meetings, academic conferences and so on, so little boys dominate in the classroom - and little girls let them.

X  (via albinwonderland)

Working with children for over a decade, this is something I’ve noticed, actually. And for the majority, the little girls in my class and my co-worker’s classes all sit quietly and listen MUCH better than the boys do. Most boys don’t care to be quiet and sit still. And I don’t think this is an attribute of boys being “rowdier” or more “hyper” - believe me, the girls are JUST as off the wall as the boys if you aren’t telling them not to. It must be a learned behavior, and it must be enforced more with the girls so they know they can’t get away with it. You have no idea how many times in my career I’ve heard “boys will be boys,” and smiling parents as they tell me with a laugh, sorry, their son is “wild” and a “handful” as they introduce him to the class.

(via voicelikehelvetica)

And that’s how you do sexism.  That’s how it’s so effectively trained into every single citizen and indoctrinated as normal and right.

(via waltzy)

Posted 1 day ago · via zombiesdocrossfit   32,674 notes

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